BEST BEER SERVING TEMPERATURE – How Best To Experience Each Style

All beer isn’t created equal when it comes to serving temperature. Each style is meant to be enjoyed in their own way. Today we explore each style of beer and what temperatures they are best served at. There’s a big difference in taste between an ice cold beer and a beer at 55 degrees F. Make sure to also check out our Best Serving Temperatures For Wines, too

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AMERICAN MACRO LAGERS / LIGHT LAGERS:
These are best cold. 33 to 40 degrees F. Store them in your fridge and serve right from there, and you’ll be all set.

PALE LAGERS / PILSNERS:
These can go a little warmer. 38 to low 40 degrees F. If there’s a solid hop game to the beer, it opens up in that low 40 degree range. Storing in the fridge is still recommended, and just let it sit a few mintues on the counter before serving. Once it you start drinking it, it’ll warm up a little in the glass, anyway.

AMBER / MARZEN / OKTOBERFEST LAGERS:
40-55 degrees F. BLONDE ALE / CREAM ALE 45-55 degrees F.

PALE ALE:
45-50 degrees F for American style. The English Pale Ales usually have more hop characteristics and benefit from being a little warmer (50-55).

INDIA PALE ALE:
This style varies a lot depending on the brew. Experiment anywhere from 45-55 degrees and see which works best for the IPA you have. The balance of the beer can vary from IPA to IPA, so it’s best to guess and check. I recommend starting at 45 degrees, and as your drink warms in the glass, see if it gets better or worse.

STOUT / BLACK ALE / PORTER:
45-55 degrees. These roasty, malty beers do great in this range. Start at 45 degrees, and let the beer warm up as you drink. Take note in how the flavor changes as it warms. Definitely stay on the cooler end of the scale for nitros.

SOURS:
45-55 degrees F. The sour and sometimes funky characteristics of these beers do better at the cooler end of the scale. The coolness can cut down on the acidity of the sourness and lessen the barnyard flavor that you sometimes get. This range is definitely personal preference.

BELGIAN DUBBELS, TRIPELS, AND QUADS:
Dubs and Quads do well in the low 50s. You get a lot of malt and high ABV with these, so a little warmer helps them shine. Tripels are a little more lighter in body, spicy, and yeasty, so they do better a little colder (40-45 degrees).

Let us know how you like your beer!

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